At the heart of conVERGENce
About Us About Us Services News Tools

News - DNS Zone Transfers now illegal in North Dakota

Jan 16, 2008 DNS Zone Transfers now illegal in North Dakota
From CircleID.com:

Jan 16, 2008 12:17 PM PST

North Dakota Judge Gets It Wrong...WAY wrong. This is just mind blowing.

Ever been prosecuted for tracking spam? Running a traceroute? Doing a zone transfer? Asking a public internet server for public information that it is configured to provide upon demand?

No? Well, David Ritz has. And amazingly, he lost the case.

Here are just a few of the gems that the court has the audacity to call ”conclusions of law.” Read them while you go donate to David’s legal defense fund. He got screwed here, folks, and needs your help.

“Ritz’s behavior in conducting a zone transfer was unauthorized within the meaning of the North Dakota Computer Crime Law.” You might not know what a zone transfer is, but I do. It’s asking a DNS server for all the particular public info it provides about a given domain. This is a common task performed by system administrators for many purposes. The judge is saying that DNS zone transfers are now illegal in North Dakota.

“The Court rejects the test for “authorization” articulated by defendant’s expert, Lawrence Baldwin. To find all access “authorized” which is successful would essentially turn the computer crime laws of this country upside down.” That’s untrue. The judge is trying to hang David out to dry, even when provided evidence of what actually constitutes hacking or cracking. Accessing a server on the public internet that is set up to provide that public info is not a crime, and saying that it is not a crime doesn’t suddenly damage computer crime law. The judge just amended the definition of “unauthorized” to include public internet servers that were expressly configured to provide info to anybody who asks for that info.

<FULL STORY>
Consulting
Development
Operations

NEWS
15.09.2015 Cisco router break-ins bypass cyber defenses
Security researchers say they have uncovered clandestine attacks across three continents on the routers that direct traffic around the Internet, potentially allowing suspected cyberspies to harvest vast amounts of data while going undetected.
03.02.2011 River of IPv4 addresses officially runs dry
In a ceremony in Miami this morning, the final five blocks of IPv4 addresses were given out to the five Regional Internet Registries that further distribute IP addresses to the far corners of the planet. The five RIRs still have tens of millions of addresses as working inventory, but once those addresses are given out, it's over.
27.05.2010 Are you ready for the big internet crunch?
The internet as we know it is reaching its limits.  Within 18 months it is estimated that the number of new devices able to connect to the world wide web will plummet as we run out of "IP addresses" -- the unique codes that provide access to the internet for everything from PCs to smart phones.  
Copyright 2018 © Vergen Inc.